Friday, June 19, 2015

From Kilkenny to Killarney

Kilbarron, Kilbeggan, Kilbride, Kilcarragh. Kilcommon, Kildalkey, Kildare, Kildorrery. Kilfithmone, Kilgarriff, Kilkee, Kildeedy. Ah, Kilkenny! I know that one. Wow, there are a lot of Kils in Ireland. Stupid me thought "Kil" might have something to do with a kiln, but of course that's wrong. It's Gaelic for church or cell--and from my reading I assume this refers to a monastic cell. Maybe.

Today, we're off to Kilkenny and Kilkarney. It's a beautiful day, bright sunny and green--an incredible day for a drive through the country on incredibly narrow roads made claustrophobic and just a tad treacherous by thriving hedges and bushes that seem to choke the road with their quaint country exuberance. It is beautiful, though.

Most of the way from Dublin to Kilkenny is an esay drive on the motorway. You can see almost as many sheep, ruins and trees choked by climbing plants from there, but you won't really have the feeling that you're risking your life in a jungle of creeping vegetation until you reach the country roads.

After ten pop songs, lots of hilarious radio announcer banter, two radio shows devoted to solving people's problems, and (oddly but also in a way endearing) the obituaries, we reach Kilkenny. As usual, what I know about the town is restricted to alcohol. In the days when I didn't know I couldn't drink beer, I had a few Kilkennys at various Irish pubs. It's a red beer as the picture above indicates in five languages. That's it: Kilkenny is the place where they make the red beer. But now I am smarter.

Kilkenny was named after St. Cainneach of Aghaboe, or Canice, which sounds like a woman but is really a man who died in the year 598; so, while you may have thought it meant the church of Kenny, the name really means the church or chapel of St. Canice. Actually, St. Canice is known as St. Kenneth in Scotland, where he lived for a while and built a church in what is now known as St. Andrews. But enough history.

Kilkenny is an easy city to explore on foot. Like almost all Irish towns, it's quaint and has a castle or a church in the middle. The Kilkenny Castle is a welcoming and stately place with a lawn dappled with locals enjoying the sun despite the "Please Keep Off the Grass" signs. The architecture is 12-century Norman, and the bathrooms in the right wing on the second floor as you're looking at the castle (you can reach them without buying a ticket to view the castle, but probably not after thousands of people read this).

The Kilkenny Castle
On the left as you're looking at the castle is a room with a free video explaining the history of Kilkenny Castle; in the turret on the right is a tearoom that serves the usual snacks. The pearl of the castle, though, is its expansive lawn.

The Lawn of the Kilkenny Castle

The Kilkenny Castle seen from the River Nore

If you want to see more of Kilkenny and you enjoy a bit of lazy cycling, you can join a group with a guide. I saw several of these groups on the path along the river Nore. I didn't do this, but I did walk very slowly when they were stopped once to listen to the guide. If you simply want to enjoy a nice walk and see a bit of the natural surroundings of Kilkenny, start your walk below the castle and walk along the river. There are also a couple of opportunities to walk up to the castle and that beautiful lawn.

A bike tour along the River Nore
Before I drive on to Killarney, there's just one more thing to mention: the music. There's no shortage of music in Ireland, and Kilkenny is no different. You can't walk three meters in the old town of Kilkenny without hearing music coming from a pub, some second-storey window or a traditional Irish singer on the street. Ireland sings. And maybe that's my first reason for loving this place so much. Yes, all the green and the sheep and the 5000-year-old ruins are nice, but the music is what gets me.

I have no idea how many pop songs Killarney is from Kilkenny. I'm too distracted (read: scared out of my mind) to count. The roads seem to get narrower and narrower as we drive west. We laugh nervously at the 100-kph speed limit. Who could drive that fast on these curvy, pencil-thin roads? How many times do I flinch as branches from the encroaching hedges swipe the car? How many times do I duck passing mirrors from oncoming cars? I will lie and tell you not once.

We reach Killarney a bit harried. I need a cider. I need to get out of the car. Actually, I need to get out of the car so bad that I forget and leave my camera there. If you want pictures of Killarney, here they are. Walking through the old town calms me. There's music everywhere, and I mean everywhere. Live music, live music, and more live music comes from every door and window in these colorful houses. And there's going to be a beer festival tomorrow. Killarney is hopping--it's the place to be--and I've never known anything about it except that it sounds good in a limerick.

So of course before I came here, I didn't know Killarney means "church of sloes," and this doesn't really tell me much either. I know what sloes are--they're a fruit similar to a plum that some people combine with gin to make sloe gin--but this brings me no closer to understanding the history of sloes in this region. So there you are: Killarney: church of fruit similar to plums.

The region around Killarney is known for its natural beauty and rich history. I was here with my father years ago. We drove around The Ring of Kerry, and sadly we weren't that impressed. Still, partly because of its proximity to this region, Killarney was named Ireland's most visited town in 2015. And its accolades also include Ireland's tidiest town. This all sounds great, but I'm just here to hear the music. In the evening, we have a few ciders and listen to a guy sing Irish tunes but also some American favorites for the tourists. It's all good fun, but I wish people would learn new songs. It seems you can't go to a pub on this planet without hearing "Country Roads" at least once.

Have you been to Kilkenny or Killarney--or any other Kil in Ireland? I'd love to hear your recommendations about what to do in these towns. I'll certainly be going back.

Hey, adorable I Must Be Off! readers! Have you entered the 2015 I Must Be Off! Travel Essay Contest? It's free! Have a look at the contest page. You have--as of today June 19--less than a month to enter.

Also, I recently won the Ginosko Literary Journal's Flash Fiction Award. Yay! You can read the story HERE

And recently, Gravel Literary Magazine published my story "Birdie's Knowledge of Signs"! Have a READ.

I must be off,
Christopher

_________________________________________

Christopher Allen is the author of Conversations with S. Teri O'Type (a Satire), an episodic adult cartoon about a man struggling with expectations. Allen's writing has appeared in Indiana Review, Night Train, Quiddity, SmokeLong Quarterly: the Best of the First Ten Years anthology, Prime Number Magazine, Contrary, [PANK] blog, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Bootsnall Travel, Chicken Soup for the Soul and lots of other good places. A finalist at Glimmer Train in 2011, Allen has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize twice.         


 

   

  

Monday, June 1, 2015

Twenty-Year Anniversary

Das Rathaus in München
Twenty years ago today, I landed in Munich with one very awkward old suitcase, three job interviews (the same day with jetlag) and my cocker spaniel, Bodie. It was a beautiful, sunny day--the first day of June 1995. It's a good thing I moved to Munich in summer; if I'd arrived here in the depths of winter, I might not have stayed.

One of the first words I learned in German was Urlaub (vacation/holiday). Germans have between 20 and 30 vacation days a year. Add these to the impressive list of public/religious holidays, and you get at least 40--if you're a permanent employee of a company. In the 20 years I've lived in Germany I've been freelance 90% of the time, which means I have rarely enjoyed the luxury of paid holiday.

But I joke often that I've been on holiday for 20 years. Somehow this sounds as if I don't work at all, but I do. I work. I teach business English in companies full-time, I'm the managing editor of the popular and busy online literary journal SmokeLong Quarterly. I write. And I write. And I write. I have grass to mow. None of this, however, takes away that "away from home" feeling of Urlaub. If you're an expat yourself, you may understand this feeling.

I'm often asked how being an expat has influenced my writing. The answer is complicated, because I think you need to change as a person before you change as a writer. I can tell you how living abroad has changed me as a person. It brought into question everything I thought I knew about the world, about my country, about humanity and about myself--OK just everything.

Having to represent your country as an expat teaches you how much you don't understand about your homeland. It's difficult to speak for 300 million people, but Americans are expected to have an opinion about everything from slavery and the atrocities inflicted on the nations of indigenous peoples that later became known as Native Americans to Iraq and the NSA. We're also supposed to know every director's name of every American film ever made. For some reason, Germans remember this kind of stuff. And if you're an English teacher, you're expected to know every word in the English language and of course how to spell it. Expectations are high.

Times Square in NYC


Another word for "expectations" is "prejudice". The world's eyes are on the US 24/7. They see us mostly through the TV and film images we create of ourselves, so it's our own fault really. The world sees the US as a country of extremes: the gorgeous yet emaciated rich and the morbidly obese poor, the Nobel Prize winners and the insanely stupid, the Democrats and the Republicans, the fundamentalist Christians and the porn industry. Sadly, most people around the world will describe Americans as obese, stupid, fundamentalist (fanatical) Christians completely ignorant of art and culture. And of course how could I have forgotten: we're all racists. This is, however, pretty much what we show the world. We make the mistake of airing or sensations, our scandals, our mass-market entertainment while we ignore everything else. We give a mic to one incredibly arrogant popstar who's proud of not reading while our thousands of literary magazines and journals enjoy less than stellar success. This is no one's fault but our own.

It took me several years to adjust to the relentless criticism of the US. I used to get furious. I used to defend the US with every bit of my conversational prowess, but now I smile, take a deep breath and concede that every country has its woes. And its stereotypes. 



And racism. On the train a few years ago in Munich, I was sitting next to a black man. When an elderly Bavarian man sat down across from us with his dog, the black man cringed. It was obvious he was a bit afraid of dogs.

"You have to get used to it," the elderly Bavarian man said loudly in German to the black man as if to say that the man needed to assimilate into German society, as if being comfortable around dogs was required for this.

"Und was ist mit mir?" I asked.

"Was?"

"And what about me?" I repeated. "I'm also foreign. I know I don't look foreign, but I am. Do I also have to get used to your dog licking my trousers?"

"I'm not a racist," the man protested (too much).

The reason I've shared this anecdote with you is because being an expat is a continual lesson in human nature. Humans can be beautiful things, but they can also be pretty damn awful. Racism is not only a US-American phenomenon, and until you live in another country you might not see this so up close. The impulse to judge someone based on their skin color alone is alive and well wherever you go on this planet. It's alive and well, for example, in Qatar right now as hundreds of Indonesians and Nepalis are dropping dead as they build arenas for the World Cup. Their lives don't matter to Qatar or FIFA. That's racism--frightening racism sanctioned and sponsored by some of the world's largest and most prominent organizations.

Putting things into perspective, being mindful of my own behavior, accepting and being patient with the imperfections of others (since I'm so utterly and incontestably perfect), respecting and enjoying real friends--that's what moving to Germany 20 years ago has taught me. Germany has also taught me to be calmer and more objective in stressful situations. And it keeps teaching me so much.

Are you an expat? What has it taught you?

Before I go, I'd like to remind writers about the 2015 I Must Be Off! Travel Essay Contest. Deadline is July 15. Guidelines HERE.

Also, I recently won the Ginosko Literary Journal's Flash Fiction contest. Yay! You can read the story HERE

And today, Gravel Literary Magazine published my story "Birdie's Knowledge of Signs"! Have a READ.

I must be off,
Christopher

_________________________________________

Christopher Allen is the author of Conversations with S. Teri O'Type (a Satire), an episodic adult cartoon about a man struggling with expectations. Allen's writing has appeared in Indiana Review, Night Train, Quiddity, SmokeLong Quarterly: the Best of the First Ten Years anthology, Prime Number Magazine, [PANK] blog, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Bootsnall Travel, Chicken Soup for the Soul and lots of other good places. A finalist at Glimmer Train in 2011, Allen has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize twice.         

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Traveling with Sweeney -- an Interview with the judge of the 2015 I Must Be Off! Travel Essay Contest

Travel writer Catherine Sweeney
Cathy, it's so gracious of you to take time out of your crazy travel schedule to talk. Where are you off to next?

Thanks, Chris. I’m headed to Italy next week with my mysterious husband/co-blogger Mr. TWS (as he’s affectionately known on our blog). I fell in love with Italy on my first visits in 2013 to Emilia-Romagna and Puglia and have been craving a return trip. This time, we’ll be in Tuscany and Rome for the first time. I’m very excited about it and have been busy trying to learn a little more Italian than I did 2 years ago.

You're the judge for the 2015 I Must Be Off! Travel Essay Contest. What kind of travel blogs, articles and books do you read yourself?

Yes, and thank you so much for the opportunity to judge the contest. I’m looking forward to reading the submissions. I enjoy a variety of blogs and online articles. I like to be surprised, either learning about new places or indulging in vicarious travel that would not necessarily be in my comfort zone. I’m just as interested in reading about trips that I might plan for myself as those I’m fairly confident I’ll never have time or inclination to pursue personally. For instance, I love to read about backpackers and their incredible adventures in Southeast Asia. It all sounds very exotic and adventurous to me, but I’m not signing up for that myself anytime soon, while still reserving the right to change my mind. Of course, blogs are also great resources for practical travel information when planning trips.

Beyond travel-specific articles and books, fiction also holds a lot of travel inspiration for me. An interesting setting can evoke an inspiration to travel there or remind me of my own past visits. I’m very impressionable: as examples, books by Iris Murdoch and A.S. Byatt inspired me to visit Cambridge, England; when I travel through Wyoming or visit the Maritimes, I think of Annie Proulx’s works.

I often refer to Independent People, a novel by Nobel laureate Halldór Laxness. It’s not at all a travel book or happy story, but with the interweaving of character situations, Icelandic folklore, and vivid descriptions of the vast landscapes, I became fascinated with Iceland. However, sadly, I’ve not yet been to Iceland!

Hemingway’s works have also greatly inspired my desire to travel. It’s the particular way he creates wonderful characters and stories while also showcasing the settings that makes the settings themselves so intriguing.

Is there are particular type of travel story that you just can't put down? And what advice would you give to other travel writers about the craft?

I’m captivated by the ones that speak to me as if I was in the story and in the place. To me, that means sharing personal impressions and expressing what sights, sounds, tastes, or emotions made the experience special to the writer. I’m most complimented by people who tell me that while reading about one of my excursions, they felt like they were right there with me.

Probably the most important advice I would offer is also very simple in concept, but not always simple to do -- be true to yourself.  I read and admire a lot of blogs and articles that have styles completely different from mine. It’s not uncommon to think that the way to success is to emulate the style of another successful writer, but I don’t think it works that way. My other advice reminds me of something I’ve seen going around the internet (inaccurately sometimes attributed to Hemingway, I think): “Write Drunk, Edit Sober”. Just kidding . . . sort of. There’s truth in this -- sit down, take a breath, and just start writing as if nobody else will ever read it. You can come back later and fine tune or even start over. So the concept is to be relaxed and just dig in. I think this lets you get closer to being yourself and also to be more efficient. Frankly, I need to do take this advice more often myself.



In September you're off to Paris with the tour Je Suis. Paris. Tell us about your role in this tour and the tour in general.

This trip is going to be so much fun! I’ve been working with Je Suis. Paris to customize the itinerary to appeal to those like me, a woman of the baby boomer generation with a passion for Paris. Je Suis. Paris has been creating wonderful small group tours for women to Paris and this is their first that is especially made for women d’un certain âge. I’ll be helping to facilitate some of the activities, but for the most part, I’ll be enjoying and sharing my excitement on the tour (which also includes things I’ve never done in Paris) with the other guests. There will be sights and activities that appeal to people of all ages, but it will be special to experience them in the company of other women with the same frame of reference. For those on return visits like me, there’s always a new perspective to appreciate about Paris. For some, it might be the first visit after years of dreaming about it and I completely relate to the feeling that I’m sure they’ll have viewing the Eiffel Tower at night for the first time. I can’t wait to see their reactions!

Pont Alexander III bridge in Paris
This sounds like an amazing way to experience a city I've been lost in more times than I can count. Paris is unique. What makes the city so captivating?

Sweeney: I’ve gotten lost wandering Paris, too --- and it’s a wonderful experience, isn’t it? For me, the captivation began at a young age which I think is true for many of us.  Through movies and books, I grew up with romantic and magical visions of Paris and dreamt of going there someday – to sit in cafes admiring fashionable Parisians, stroll through Montmartre or along the Seine, visit the Louvre, and see in person all of the other famous sights of Paris. And the “City of Light” doesn’t disappoint. Also, as a person who took French in high school, but retained very little, I love being where I’m hearing that beautiful language everywhere (whether I’m understanding it all or not).

Why should people choose a tour with an itinerary as opposed to going it alone?

I don’t think that all tours are equal. A custom tour for a small group is much different than a generic one for a large group. Collaborating with Je Suis. Paris on the itinerary, I looked at it with an eye of a baby boomer woman who never tires of the familiar sights in Paris, but looks forward to exploring new areas. The tour is going to give us an insider’s look as it includes activities that not many visitors on their own would be able to arrange or even know about. I’m really looking forward to some of the immersive experiences such as cooking with a chef and strolling around the Saint-Germain-des-Prés area with a renowned author to see the haunts of literary greats such as Hemingway, Joyce, the Fitzgeralds, and Gertrude Stein.

The Eiffel Tower from the Seine at night
It’s a great opportunity for first time visitors to be in the hands of experts like Je Suis. Paris and the English-speaking guides they provide at the same time being in a small enough group where there isn’t a feeling of being part of a crowd.

On the “A Boomer in Paris” tour there will also be some time for guests to do some exploring on their own, if they like. So I think it offers a wonderful balance of guidance and independence.

Are there places available?

Yes, there are. Your readers can contact Je Suis. Paris directly for details and booking. There’s information about the tour on their website, but they are also happy to take phone calls to discuss the trip.

Cathy, once again, thank you for the chat. I can't wait to hear about your next gourmet adventure at Traveling with Sweeney. They are always so informative--really compelling travel writing.

It’s been my pleasure, Chris. Thanks for the kind words and following along with me in my travels on the blog. I promise there will be some delicious stories and pictures coming up from Italy soon. Ciao!

Ciao bella!
I must be off,
Christopher

______________________________________________

On the Traveling with Sweeney website, Catherine Sweeney and her husband/frequent travel companion (affectionately known on their blog as Mr. TWS) aim to inform, entertain, and inspire seasoned travelers as well as those considering their first travel steps. Through their compelling photos and stories, they highlight the best of destinations, food, wine, history, culture, and the arts with a particular focus on North America and Europe. Catherine is also founder and editor of Boomer Women Travelers, a collaborative site for women of the baby boomer generation to share their travel experiences.

Christopher Allen is the author of Conversations with S. Teri O'Type (a Satire), an episodic adult cartoon about a man struggling with expectations. Allen's writing has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Indiana Review, Night Train, Quiddity, SmokeLong Quarterly: the Best of the First Ten Years anthology, Prime Number Magazine, [PANK] blog, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Bootsnall Travel, Chicken Soup for the Soul and lots of other good places. A finalist at Glimmer Train in 2011, Allen has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize twice.   

Friday, May 1, 2015

Newgrange on a Soggy Irish Day

Sightseeing in Ireland
The windows of the shuttle bus are steamed up with the morning breath of tourists. There's a mildewy cloud around the guy sitting across from us. He probably left his rain jacket wadded up in his backpack. It's more than drizzling outside, not the best day for sightseeing. Despite the weather, there's excited chatter everywhere in English, Italian, Russian and German. Waiting for the last couple of passengers, we're about to visit one of the most important archeological sites in Ireland: the 5000-year-old Newgrange.

As is often the case, despite documentaries and airplane magazine articles, I know almost nothing about this place. Of course I could pick it out of a line-up. I know its name but have no idea what it means, and before driving to it this morning I couldn't have placed it on a map of Ireland--although I knew from the airplane magazine that it was somewhere in the Boyne Valley.  As it turns out, Newgrange is a mere 58 km north of Dublin (or seven pop songs and quite a lot of hilarious radio-presenter banter). If you don't want to drive there, you can book a day tour of the Boyne Valley for quite a reasonable rate. This tour looks like the right thing to do.

Steven the Goat Milker's Assistant and I don't do this tour of course. We drive. And as we're driving down country roads, past farmhouses with pretty little gardens--or that's what I'm imagining through these fogged up windows--I'm convinced that Newgrange was a sort of dwelling. Crazily, I'm imagining Vikings and hide-clad Neolithic folk with long matted dirty hair that always smells like what they've been cooking--the type permanently frozen in poses of hunting and gathering or building their rudimentary huts in museums. I know all this is wrong, but it's still what I'm imagining.

But of course I remember that I know a bit more than I thought. These mounds make an appearance in the Leprechaun stories as the places where the aos sí, ghostlike creatures of the ancient Tuatha Dé people, took to when they were conquered by the Milesians. And of course the hundreds of these mounds that still dapple the countryside of Ireland today are in fact burial mounds. But hold on: this is not actually true when it comes to Newgrange--but I'll get to this later.

Newgrange from my dry seat on the shuttle bus

For now, I'm not done griping about the soggy Irish weather yet. Rain is so inconveniently moist. There's the wetness of it--no denying the wetness--but there's also the inevitable undryness. And then some guy leaves his undry rain jacket in his backpack for three days, and we have an icky-sweet mildew smell to deal with. This is Ireland; you might as well get over it. It's always just a little damp here.

Are you claustrophobic? I'm not. I kind of like caves, closets and co. I think I could have lived in Newgrange as a mythical Leprechaun. I'm kind of short, like green, rainbows, pots of gold and very tight spaces. If you're not a Leprechaun yourself, you'll need to watch your head as you enter and exit Newgrange. There's a guide standing at the entrance nagging everyone to watch their heads (and not take pictures). I guess a few Scandinavians must have left with mild concussions.





Once inside, you'll hunch along the 19-meter passageway that leads to the cross-shaped chamber. You'll need to turn sideways a couple of times to inch through. Some of you might not even get through, to be honest. It was a squeeze for me and I have a 30-inch waist (although the problem might have been more my belly than my waist).

In the chamber itself, the floor you're standing on will be two meters higher than the entrance. The floor is actually level with the hole above the entrance where the sun shines through (weather permitting) on the winter solstice. And if you're lucky enough to be one of the 50 (plus one guest) who win the yearly lottery, you'll be able to view this spectacle with only four other mildewy lucky people. Otherwise, you'll have to make due with the demonstration using artificial light. You'll also have to be satisfied with a 10-minute stay inside the site. The rest of the tour is outside. In the rain.

A rear view of Newgrange

The controversial facade reconstructed in the 70s from original Newgrange stones

It's no wonder we assume these ancient people worshipped the sun. It's like all religions: we worship what we can't see and what seldom answers our prayers the way we want. Fact is, we don't know exactly how this place was used or why it was abandoned thousands of years ago. My completely unscientific theory of what Newgrange was used for: a Neolithic time machine that would transport the cremated remains of some Neolithic Pope sort of celebrity into the next world. It's worth mentioning that no signs of smoke have been found on the corbeled ceiling of the monument. The cremated remains that rested in the three basins in Newgrange were burnt somewhere else, brought into the monument--possibly during the winter solstice--and then removed.

The visitor center is certainly worth a visit as well. The small museum is informative and does indeed have a model of hairy hide-clad Neolithic people--so my imagination is not completely wacky after all. Be sure to check out the cafeteria, which has an impressive menu and also a few prepackaged gluten-free items. I wasn't hungry enough to grab one, but it was good to know they were there.

I must be off,
Christopher

Have you started writing your entry for the 2015 I Must Be Off! Travel Essay Contest? It's free, and there's cash to be won. Guidelines HERE.

______________________________________________

Christopher Allen is the author of Conversations with S. Teri O'Type (a Satire), an episodic adult cartoon about a man struggling with expectations. Allen's writing has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Indiana Review, Night Train, Quiddity, SmokeLong Quarterly: the Best of the First Ten Years anthology, Prime Number Magazine, [PANK] blog, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Bootsnall Travel, Chicken Soup for the Soul and lots of other good places. A finalist at Glimmer Train in 2011, Allen has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize twice. 






Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Call for Submissions -- Writers Abroad Anthology Kaleidoscope

Expat or formerly expat authors, here is an excellent opportunity to get published! Writers Abroad will begin accepting submissions to their anthology entitled Kaleidoscope on May 1. Whether you are a writer of short prose, flash fiction or poetry, the good and talented folks at Writers Abroad would love to read your work on the theme of LIGHT.

Click HERE for Guidelines.

I must be off,
Christopher

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Christopher Allen is the author of Conversations with S. Teri O'Type (a Satire), an episodic adult cartoon about a man struggling with expectations. Allen's writing has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Indiana Review, Night Train, Quiddity, SmokeLong Quarterly: the Best of the First Ten Years anthology, Prime Number Magazine, [PANK] blog, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Bootsnall Travel, Chicken Soup for the Soul and lots of other good places. A finalist at Glimmer Train in 2011, Allen has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize twice.    

Monday, March 23, 2015

Announcing the Third Annual I Must Be Off! Travel Essay Contest!

It's that time of year again: time to type up those travel articles, travel anecdotes and travel reflections. If it's about travel, we want to read it. We want to read about that place that changed you.We want to read about the experiences you can't wait to share with other travelers. Whether your work is humorous, informative, quirky or profound--we want to read it.

Previous Winners and Placers:

"Oh, Calcutta" by Paola Fornari
"The Scarlet Mile" by Gillian Brown
"Bodrum, Turkey's San Tropez" by Jack Scott
"The Children of Chitwan, Nepal" by Hannah Thompson-Yates
"God's Own Country" by Saahil Acharya

Travel Writer Catherine Sweeney
The 2015 Judge -- Catherine Sweeney of Traveling with Sweeney

Catherine’s passion for travel goes back to her childhood in the Chicago area when her family crisscrossed North America on extensive road trips. Today, as a boomer woman traveler she approaches new destinations as well as familiar favorites with eager anticipation and youthful enthusiasm. On the Traveling with Sweeney website, Catherine and her husband/frequent travel companion (affectionately known on their blog as Mr. TWS) aim to inform, entertain, and inspire seasoned travelers as well as those considering their first travel steps. Through their compelling photos and stories, they highlight the best of destinations, food, wine, history, culture, and the arts with a particular focus on North America and Europe. Catherine is also founder and editor of Boomer Women Travelers, a collaborative site for women of the baby boomer generation to share their travel experiences.

Submission Guidelines:
  • Maximum 1200 words
  • Edited to the best of your ability for spelling, grammar and punctuation
  • Up to three photos may be submitted with your entry. Photos not necessary to win.
  • Previously unpublished work only! Blog posts are considered published.
  • No entry fee. Yes, that's right. You have nothing to lose.
  • Open to anyone worldwide, but you need a PayPal account
  • Entries must be in English
  • One entry per person
  • Deadline for submissions: July 15, 2015
  • Send entries with a 50-word third-person bio to christopher.imustbeoff@gmail.com with the heading TRAVEL ESSAY CONTEST. All entries will be read blind by this year's judge, travel writer Catherine Sweeney It is not necessary to delete identifying information from your entry. If your name appears anywhere, it will be removed before it's forwarded to the judge.
  • Word doc, docx and rtf files only please. 
  • Finalists and Winners announced in August 2015

The Prizes: 
  • The Top essays will be published at I Must Be Off! (Authors retain copyright.)
  • Second place prize: $50
  • First place prize: $200
  • Readers' Choice Award ($50) based on unique hits and comments tallied on September 30.

Good luck and happy writing!

I must be off,
Christopher

_________________________________________

Christopher Allen is the author of Conversations with S. Teri O'Type (a Satire), an episodic adult cartoon about a man struggling with expectations. Allen's writing has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Indiana Review, Night Train, Quiddity, SmokeLong Quarterly: the Best of the First Ten Years anthology, Prime Number Magazine, [PANK] blog, Necessary Fiction, Word Riot, Bootsnall Travel, Chicken Soup for the Soul and lots of other good places. A finalist at Glimmer Train in 2011, Allen has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize twice.    

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

RECENT AND FORTHCOMING WORK!!!!

  • "Box of Nazi" at Contrary fall 2014 / winter 2015

  • "Out and Away" in Quiddity spring 2015 (print and audio)

  • "Sisters" at The Miscreant

  • A Kind of Dream by Kelly Cherry--Reviewed by Christopher Allen at Blue Five Notebook Series (Blue Fifth Review)
  • "Dothead" at Spelk Fiction (March 1, 2015)